Michigan

  • July 18, 2024

    6th Circ. Questions If Kellogg 401(k) Claims Can Be Arbitrated

    A Sixth Circuit panel on Thursday suggested the terms of Kellogg Co.'s retirement plan may bar a former accountant from bringing claims the plan was mismanaged, as the company tries to enforce an arbitration clause that arguably prevents planwide relief. 

  • July 18, 2024

    Feds Say UAW Shouldn't Be Able To Keep Info From Monitor

    Allowing the United Auto Workers to withhold information from the court-appointed monitor overseeing its cleanup from days of corruption and embezzlement would undermine the purpose of the monitorship, the federal government and the monitor told a Michigan federal judge, asking him to deny the union's bid to shield documents.

  • July 17, 2024

    Whirlpool Wants To Wash Away Service Plan Repair Claims

    Whirlpool asked a Washington federal judge to send a proposed consumer class action down the drain, saying the aggrieved customer can't claim she was deceived about the details of an extended repair plan for a dishwasher when the full terms have always been easy to find online.

  • July 17, 2024

    Nexstar Aims To Ax Ex-Workers' Pride Memo Defamation Suits

    Nexstar Media Group moved Wednesday to dismiss two Michigan federal defamation lawsuits brought by television news managers who were fired after disseminating a memo urging reporters to tone down and balance Pride Month coverage, arguing that both suits lack proof that false and reckless statements were made.

  • July 17, 2024

    Drivers' Transmission Complaints Are 'Old News,' GM Says

    Drivers waited too long to file a proposed class action accusing General Motors LLC of selling vehicles with faulty transmissions, the automaker said in a motion Tuesday arguing that many of the claims must be dismissed.

  • July 17, 2024

    6th Circ. To Review 2 Standards In FirstEnergy's Cert. Fight

    The Sixth Circuit indicated Wednesday that it would have to examine the applicability of two different class certification standards in a securities suit by FirstEnergy investors, as the company insisted there was no proof its statements influenced stock prices, and that purported omissions didn't factor into the mix.

  • July 17, 2024

    Rocket Mortgage Says Results Refute Investors' Fraud Claims

    Rocket Mortgage is arguing that the company didn't mislead its shareholders when Rocket's former CEO claimed the company could grow its lending business in a rising interest rate environment because the firm's actual financial performance ended up proving that prediction true.

  • July 17, 2024

    UMich Ducks Black Law Prof's Bias, Retaliation Suit

    A Michigan federal judge released the University of Michigan on Wednesday from a Black law professor's lawsuit accusing the school of harshly disciplining her after she complained about race discrimination, saying she failed to rebut the university's argument that she was punished because she threatened staff members.

  • July 17, 2024

    Judge Says Atty Shouldn't Be Deported For Crash Scheme

    A Michigan federal judge on Wednesday urged federal officials not to deport a Canadian attorney sentenced for his involvement in an illegal crash victim solicitation scheme, saying that outside of the scheme, the attorney has a "hell of a lot" to offer the community.

  • July 17, 2024

    6th Circ. Skeptical About Nixing Diver's Harassment Verdict

    The Sixth Circuit appeared inclined Wednesday to uphold a $58,000 verdict awarded to a commercial diver who accused an environmental cleanup company of subjecting her to harassment and belittlement, with several judges expressing doubt about superseding the jury's conclusion. 

  • July 17, 2024

    Fiat Chrysler, Workers To Mediate OT Dispute

    A Michigan federal judge agreed to hit pause on a proposed class and collective action accusing Fiat Chrysler of failing to fully pay workers overtime while the parties engage in mediation.

  • July 16, 2024

    Rocket Cos. Investors Drop CEO Retweet Claims From Suit

    Investors in mortgage lender Rocket Companies have dropped certain proposed class action claims against the company's CEO, telling a Michigan federal judge that they would no longer accuse the executive of securities fraud over a March 2021 retweet.

  • July 16, 2024

    6th Circ. Says Credit Union Can't Sue T-Mobile Over Cell Scam

    The Sixth Circuit on Tuesday ruled that a lower court was correct in tossing a lawsuit in which Michigan First Credit Union sued T-Mobile to recover the reimbursement fees the credit union paid to customers after they suffered unauthorized electronic transfers of money from their accounts due to cellphone scams.

  • July 16, 2024

    Enbridge Seeks 6th Circ. Rehearing In Venue Dispute

    Enbridge Energy LP has asked the full Sixth Circuit to rehear an appellate panel's decision to send the company's pipeline dispute with Michigan's attorney general back to state court, arguing that the opinion creates a conflict within the circuit over when the removal clock starts running.

  • July 16, 2024

    Judge's Emails To Prosecutor Unethical But Didn't Taint Trial

    A judge should have recused herself after emailing the elected prosecutor during trial to complain that an officer "didn't do a very good investigation," but the ethical lapse didn't warrant a new trial, the Michigan Supreme Court ruled Tuesday.

  • July 16, 2024

    I 'Suggest You Stop,' Judge Warns Atty In UMich Graffiti Case

    A Michigan federal judge stopped an attorney in his tracks on Tuesday as he argued his former University of Michigan hockey-player client did something "stupid" by painting a homophobic slur in front of a campus Jewish center, with the judge saying it was clear the player did something "very wrong."

  • July 16, 2024

    Pentagon, GSA Seek 'Record-Setting' Clean Energy Projects

    The U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. General Services Administration say they are going for "record-setting federal purchases of clean energy" in a joint statement seeking contractors who will be able to get multiple federal facilities running entirely on carbon-pollution-free power by 2030.

  • July 16, 2024

    Pet Store Chain Says AIG Unit Must Cover BIPA Claims

    An AIG unit is misconstruing policy exclusions in refusing to defend Pet Supplies Plus in a class action alleging violations of Illinois' Biometric Information Privacy Act, the pet store chain told a Michigan federal judge.

  • July 16, 2024

    The 2024 Diversity Snapshot: What You Need To Know

    Law firms' ongoing initiatives to address diversity challenges have driven another year of progress, with the representation of minority attorneys continuing to improve across the board, albeit at a slower pace than in previous years. Here's our data dive into minority representation at law firms in 2023.

  • July 16, 2024

    These Firms Have The Most Diverse Equity Partnerships

    Law360’s law firm survey shows that firms' efforts to diversify their equity partner ranks are lagging. But some have embraced a broader talent pool at the equity partner level. Here are the ones that stood out.

  • July 16, 2024

    Latham-Led Warehouse Giant Launches Potential $3.6B IPO

    Cold-storage warehouse giant Lineage Inc. on Tuesday set a price range on an estimated $3.6 billion initial public offering, represented by Latham & Watkins LLP and underwriters counsel Goodwin Procter LLP, bolstering the near-term IPO pipeline.

  • July 15, 2024

    Biggest Transportation Decisions: Midyear 2024 Review

    The U.S. Supreme Court's upending of a legal doctrine applying to federal agencies' regulatory powers, the dismantling of JetBlue's proposed acquisition of Spirit Airlines and the preservation of California's authority to set its vehicle emissions standards are among the biggest court decisions so far in 2024 affecting the transportation industry.

  • July 15, 2024

    Detroit Must Face Bus Rider's Injury Suit, Mich. Panel Says

    The city of Detroit can't escape a lawsuit claiming one of its bus drivers intentionally hit the brakes in an effort to injure a passenger she was arguing with, causing injuries to another commuter, a Michigan appeals court ruled, saying the claims fall squarely with the motor-vehicle exception to governmental immunity.

  • July 15, 2024

    GM Eyes Deal In Design Patent Fight At PTAB

    LKQ Corp. and General Motors Co. are looking to come to a deal to settle a legal dispute over GM's design patent covering fenders at the Patent Trial and Appeal Board.

  • July 15, 2024

    UAW Staff Culture Needs More Work, Monitor Says

    Remnants remain of the "culture of fear and reprisal" that gripped the United Auto Workers when union leaders were embezzling funds and accepting bribes from automakers in the 2010s, but progress has been made toward cultural change at the union, a court-appointed monitor said in his latest report.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Now More Than Ever, Lawyers Must Exhibit Professionalism

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    As society becomes increasingly fractured and workplace incivility is on the rise, attorneys must champion professionalism and lead by example, demonstrating how lawyers can respectfully disagree without being disagreeable, says Edward Casmere at Norton Rose.

  • Series

    Serving In The National Guard Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My ongoing military experience as a judge advocate general in the National Guard has shaped me as a person and a lawyer, teaching me the importance of embracing confidence, balance and teamwork in both my Army and civilian roles, says Danielle Aymond at Baker Donelson.

  • A Midyear Forecast: Tailwinds Expected For Atty Hourly Rates

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    Hourly rates for partners, associates and support staff continued to rise in the first half of this year, and this growth shows no signs of slowing for the rest of 2024 and into next year, driven in part by the return of mergers and acquisitions and the widespread adoption of artificial intelligence, says Chuck Chandler at Valeo Partners.

  • Opinion

    States Should Loosen Law Firm Ownership Restrictions

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    Despite growing buzz, normalized nonlawyer ownership of law firms is a distant prospect, so the legal community should focus first on liberalizing state restrictions on attorney and firm purchases of practices, which would bolster succession planning and improve access to justice, says Michael Di Gennaro at The Law Practice Exchange.

  • FLSA Conditional Certification Is Alive And Well In 4th Circ.

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    A North Carolina federal court's recent decision in Johnson v. PHP emphasized continued preference by courts in the Fourth Circuit for a two-step conditional certification process for Fair Labor Standards Act collective actions, rejecting views from other circuits and affording plaintiffs a less burdensome path, say Joshua Adams and Damón Gray at Jackson Lewis.

  • Series

    Solving Puzzles Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Tackling daily puzzles — like Wordle, KenKen and Connections — has bolstered my intellectual property litigation practice by helping me to exercise different mental skills, acknowledge minor but important details, and build and reinforce good habits, says Roy Wepner at Kaplan Breyer.

  • Texas Ethics Opinion Flags Hazards Of Unauthorized Practice

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    The Texas Professional Ethics Committee's recently issued proposed opinion finding that in-house counsel providing legal services to the company's clients constitutes the unauthorized practice of law is a valuable clarification given that a UPL violation — a misdemeanor in most states — carries high stakes, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Julienne Pasichow at HWG.

  • Why High Court Social Media Ruling Will Be Hotly Debated

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    In deciding the NetChoice cases that challenged Florida and Texas content moderation laws, what the U.S. Supreme Court justices said about social media platforms — and the First Amendment — will have implications and raise questions for nearly all online operators, say Jacob Canter and Joanna Rosen Forster at Crowell & Moring.

  • In Memoriam: The Modern Administrative State

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    On June 28, the modern administrative state, where courts deferred to agency interpretations of ambiguous statutes, died when the U.S. Supreme Court overruled its previous decision in Chevron v. Natural Resources Defense Council — but it is survived by many cases decided under the Chevron framework, say Joseph Schaeffer and Jessica Deyoe at Babst Calland.

  • Opinion

    Justices' Malicious-Prosecution Ruling Shows Rare Restraint

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decision in Chiaverini v. City of Napoleon, Ohio, declining to limit malicious-prosecution suits, is a model of judicial modesty and incrementalism, in sharp contrast to the court’s dramatic swings on other rights, says Steven Schwinn at the University of Illinois Chicago Law School.

  • How To Clean Up Your Generative AI-Produced Legal Drafts

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    As law firms increasingly rely on generative artificial intelligence tools to produce legal text, attorneys should be on guard for the overuse of cohesive devices in initial drafts, and consider a few editing pointers to clean up AI’s repetitive and choppy outputs, says Ivy Grey at WordRake.

  • Series

    After Chevron: Various Paths For Labor And Employment Law

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    Labor and employment law leans heavily on federal agency guidance, so the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to toss out Chevron deference will ripple through this area, with future workplace policies possibly taking shape through strategic litigation, informal guidance, state-level regulation and more, says Alexander MacDonald at Littler.

  • Series

    Boxing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Boxing has influenced my legal work by enabling me to confidently hone the skills I've learned from the sport, like the ability to remain calm under pressure, evaluate an opponent's weaknesses and recognize when to seize an important opportunity, says Kirsten Soto at Clyde & Co.

  • Opinion

    Industry Self-Regulation Will Shine Post-Chevron

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's Loper decision will shape the contours of industry self-regulation in the years to come, providing opportunities for this often-misunderstood practice, says Eric Reicin at BBB National Programs.

  • 3 Ways Agencies Will Keep Making Law After Chevron

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    The U.S. Supreme Court clearly thinks it has done something big in overturning the Chevron precedent that had given deference to agencies' statutory interpretations, but regulated parties have to consider how agencies retain significant power to shape the law and its meaning, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

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